26 October 2013

Silky Oaks ...and birds

The Silky Oak trees were vibrant throughout this trip; seen along roadsides and on farming properties.  Tall growing, and covered in flowers like this.  An Australian native, the largest Grevillea type, grows up to 30 metres (almost 100 feet).


Various birds were using them; Noisy Friarbird

Rosella





feeding in the uppermost branches



adding this delightful Little Friarbird, though it wasn't sitting in the Silky Oak, there is one flowering directly behind it

20 comments:

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

They don't look much like oaks but they certainly attract some beautiful and interesting birds.

Carole M. said...

Hi John, apparently also known as Australian Silver Oak, not closely related to the Quercus Oak you know over there

Karen @ Pieces of Contentment said...

I love how our native plants are so attractive to our birds. you have some lovely shots of both Silky Oak and birds here.

Joop Zand said...

Lovely birds with nice colors Carole...... your pictures are very good.

Greetings, Joop

Bob Bushell said...

All them are beautiful, but, the last, Little Friarbird is superb, well spotted Carole.

Gumer Paz said...

I draw much attention, how do you see so many birds. A lovely photos especially the last one, with the Little Friarbird. A kiss Carole and Have a nice weekend :)

Grandma Barb's This and That said...

The silky oaks are an interesting tree. Love the colors of the flowers. It's always a delight to see your birds!

TexWisGirl said...

very pretty trees. :)

Sinbad and I on the Loose said...

That is an interesting leaf structure for a tree being an oak. Wonderful bird photos as always.

Our photos said...

You have make beautiful photos, Carole!
Greetings, RW & SK

Carole M. said...

thanks everyone for your comments. Gumer "how do you see so many birds" you asked. Became interested to try photographing birds about two years ago. The more you get out and search for them, the more you 'get lucky' and see them. Exploring new locations is always a treat in search for 'new birds' you mightn't get to see near to home base. I'm finding that the more I get out and listen to them, the more familiar I become with their calls too making it easier to locate a bird and know its ID when photographing (if I can get that wonderful opportunity). It can be a little daunting, they have a mind of their own and won't often stay where you want them to :) but it's a big buzz if it works.

Terri Buster said...

What a pretty tree- I don't guess I have ever seen one before. Wonderful shots of the birds too.

Montanagirl said...

Lovely trees, love the silky oaks. The Rosellas are sure beautiful.

Jan Castle said...

What gorgeous and showy trees!!!!! TFS Carole!

Brian King said...

Beautiful trees! And so are the Rosella's! Really nice shot of the Friarbird!

Wally Jones said...

We're beginning to see the Silky Oak used in landscaping here in the U.S. Hope it will attract as many beautiful birds as it appears to down under!

Hope your weekend is going well, Carole.

Jeanne said...

Have never seen this amazing type of oak Carole. so unusual, but it really looks as if the birds love it, and you have gotten some incredible shots of these colorful birds. Love your post.

Margaret Adamson said...

Hi Carole I love your native plants and the birds you find in them especially love the Rosellas

Stewart M said...

Great set of shots! I do like the rosellas.

According to the same source as is used by our Minister for the Environment (!) some Yellow Admirals do overwinter as adults. Having said that, I included it in the post because I have always thought it was true - not because I knew it to be true (if you see what I mean!)

Cheers - Stewart M - Melbourne

Andrew Fulton said...

The tree looks amazing Carole but the Rosellas steal the show...