07 October 2013

Dollarbird

From early morning, at this time of year, a very familiar call, kak-kak-kak, echoes from the tops of the Angophora tree. I want photos, and it's a difficult angle to poise the camera; my neck hurts!

At 1200mm hand-held, you can only expect record-shots at best, so I brace myself, hold tight, press the shutter ...and hope something will be good enough. There's a lot of atmosphere between me, and that bird.



 The Dollarbird is robust/stocky style of bird with lovely blue and lavender toned feathers contrasting with a strong red beak.

this is the big tree above all others where the Dollarbird likes to watch out from.  It sits solitary, though I hear a return call from another Dollarbird, somewhere is the distance.   


Every now and then it flies off in a swooping motion and does a wide circle, no doubt picking up small insects, and then returns.  Often, to a differing part of the tree.  

Overhanging branches make for the strong contrasting shadows.

Generally the Dollarbird seems to dissapear after the early morning session, and I will hear it again in the late afternoon.  The lighting at that time of day isn't at all in my favour though; photos taken then up into the tree will produce just a silhouette of the bird and a washed-out background.  These then, are as good as it gets, enough to document at least.

Later addition:  Thanks John for your question!  Why is it called a Dollar-bird?  According to Birds in Backyards fact-sheet here this migratory bird from New Guinea, is so named because of "silvery, circular patches on the underside of the wings, thought to resemble the American silver dollar coin".

18 comments:

Evelyn S. said...

1200mm??? Wow...that's a huge lens! And hand-held? You're a brave woman. I do like the images of the dollar bird, though!

Carole M. said...

Evelyn it's the max on the Sony Cybershot DSC-HX300 (x50 zoom). It's not 'huge' size-wise, say like a Canon lens attachment. You will find data in my sidebar relating to this camera. I'd love to work a couple hours with the big toys though!

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

OK, I'll ask - why's it called a Dollarbird?

Joop Zand said...

Lovely bird is this....i like this post again very much Carole.

Greetings from Holland, Joop

Carole M. said...

Thanks John for your question! Why is it called a Dollar-bird? According to Birds in Backyards fact-sheet here this migratory bird from New Guinea, is so named because of "silvery, circular patches on the underside of the wings, thought to resemble the American silver dollar coin".

Irma said...

Beautiful series of these dollar bird, Carole.
This species is not present here.
The first picture is my favorite.
Greetings Irma

eileeninmd said...

Carole, your Dollar-bird is cool. Great shots! Thanks for sharing, have a happy week!

Jenny Short said...

Well, I just learned something new. Dollarbird. My lens is not strong enough to catch one. Thanks for the beautiful photos. xo Jenny

Linley S said...

As per usual, great shots Carole. The colours are great and that strong beak is striking.

Montanagirl said...

Beautiful shots of that Dollar Bird. I was wondering how the name came about as well, but soon discovered the answer at the end of your post.

TexWisGirl said...

oh, that is a cute little stout thing. :)

Margaret Adamson said...

HI Carole That's interesting why it is called the Dollarbird. I love your shots against the blue sky.

Ida said...

Well it was fun stopping by and seeing what a "Dollar" bird looks like. I like the bright red beak. That is some tall tree that it perches in. I'm glad you were able to get these shots.

Ed said...

You've got lots of nice bird images here. Many I've never seen - very interesting. I'm amazed at how well you can hold the 1200mm lens.

Thanks too for the comment on my Zenfolio site.

Ed Hass

Jan Castle said...

I think you have captured the 'pot at the end of the rainbow' with your pictures of the 'Dollarbird' Carole! It's like being within arms reach...amazing!!!!
TFS,
Jan

Sharyl said...

The names are as interesting as the birds themselves!

Terri Buster said...

Nicely captured! And I do like the contrast of the thick branches..very neat shots!

Brian King said...

You did a fantastic job! These are great photos! Long distance shots are difficult to get at times.