21 November 2012

Dollar bird


Aiming up high into the angophora and with grey skies, it was hard to capture this pair with light flooding the camera lens.  Angophoras are shedding their bark at this time of year, revealing a lovely warm ochre underskin.  It was to be these pics of dollar birds or none, as they never seem to be sitting around on low territory.

Red arrow shows location of the first snapshot.  

According to Australian Birds website, the Dollar bird resides in New Guinea over the Australian winter, which means approximately 2600 klms. of flight to reach here.




Every now and then the bird on the left would take off, no doubt picking up insects, and on return it appeared perhaps to be feeding the other bird.  Not sure if it was 'the other half' or a juvenile.


Dollar bird name is derived from the single white spot (on the underside) of each wing, resembling a silver-dollar coin.


This' the bird on the go, flying about the tree while the other stayed put; and now I had a better angle for this snapshot.


I wonder if it had an injured wing ... or maybe just 'sunning'?

and here ... would this just be a propping up, bracing against the winds technique, or ....?

Sharing with Wild Bird Wednesday

Special Note:  Since this post is going through to the bird-watching community, if you missed my previous video-post, it might be of interest.  The para-gliding-hawk is here.

25 comments:

TexWisGirl said...

cute little stout birds! :)

Julie Storry said...

I don't see any of these around the suburbs, but I did see them once on a trip up the back roads of the Hawkesbury. What we have around here at the moment is a Koel ... or perhaps more than one. He sits high in a tree and just lets his call roll on and on and on. I always though he was called an 'Indian Koel' but can only google him as a 'common koel'. The female has a more striking plumage than the male, who simply has THE most striking red eye.

You might try your camera on 'spot metering' to highlight the bird and 'blowout' the background a bit.

Carole M. said...

thanks Julie for the tip on spot-metering. I hadn't thought of that at all for daytime shots. I've only ever used it for the few moon shots I've tried.

Shaun Gibbs said...

Those are some stunning birds you have captured Carole. I take it you are using Something like a 300mm lens on a tripod for this shot? or something at least with VR built in... Simply beautiful.

Shaun

Gary said...

Quite the beauties!! Boom & Gary of the Vermilon River, Canada.

Crafty Gardener said...

cute bird, not one I've seen before

mick said...

You got some great photos of the Dollar Birds - even if they were distant. They are around up here but I seldom see them.

Renae said...

Carole! hi! i haven't seen you here for along time. i don't know why i miss some post and see others over and over?

that is amazing that you can zoom in that much. i need a new camera for christmas!!!!!!!!!!!

Sinbad and I on the Loose said...

Are you using your tele-convertor on this one? That is amazing the clarity you are getting at such a distance. Well done Carole.

Carole M. said...

glad that some of you are getting to see a 'new' bird.
Shaun: I'm using a tele-conversion lens at the max which equates to about 732 mm, and do have to try and press the shutter almost with my breath held to try and prevent shuddering. Some photos turn out better than others; sometimes I just get lucky. Taking a tripod for bird shots just doesn't work for me. My lil' ole' camera does have an image stabilization option that I keep on all the time just to give me a helping hand especially for these long-distance shots.

Sinbad and I on the Loose (John), yep the tele-converter on. I rely on it for most all my birding shots. Thanks :)!

Andrea said...

You have so many amazing birds that we never see here. I love these sweet little birds and the fact that one is caring for the other ... Hopefully it is a juvenile brancher not an injured bird. Nice shots and from such a distance. Thank you for sharing.

Andrea @ From The Sol

Grandma Barb's This and That said...

Another interesting bird, Carole! I'm wondering why the trees loose their bark. It is a pretty color underneath.

Brian King said...

Another bird I've never seen before. I love how they got their name! Very handsome birds, too!

Carole M. said...

Grandma Barb! :) The angophoras shed their skin like this as they grow too big for it, it's an annual process this time of year, rather like a snake shedding it's skin. Why the your huge ole' oak trees don't also do this I can't explain.

Carole M. said...

Brian ... these are the Eastern Grey's. There are other kangaroo species but this is our 'local' one

Carole M. said...

Julie: this one is for you especially! juvenile koel

Jan Castle said...

So trust the 'stay put' bird is not injured! Lovely to look at...great pics Carole!
Paper Hugs,
Jan

Stewart M said...

The spot metering idea is good - either than or "over expose" the shot by about +1 - either way can work.

I think that dollar birds (not that I've seen huge numbers!) are very distinctive in flight - they seem to have very round wings.

Cheers and thanks for linking to WBW - Stewart M - Melbourne

Judy said...

Is it just me, or do the beaks look too heavy for the frame of the bird?

Anonymous said...

Some interesting observations Carole. I wonder if these birds mate for life?
Burtine

Montanagirl said...

That's a nifty looking bird!

Pam :) said...

Beautiful series of shots, you captured them perfectly, Carole. We don't get to see Dollar birds here in the USA.. and what a great name!

Crafty Green Poet said...

what a handsome bird!

Mary Howell Cromer said...

What neat looking birds, and you got some really great images as well. I hope that you enjoy your weekend...I like that you take your camera just about everywhere you go...me to;') My camera and my purse~

Wally Jones said...

Wonderful images! As with many others, it's a new bird for me. Interesting behaviour! Your shots are just fine as they represesent what birdwatchers actually put up with! Inconsiderate birds just refuse to pose properly!