28 December 2013

Central Coast Wetlands - part two

One of the original cottages from the Pioneer Dairy days of yesteryear.  So nicely renovated too, by the volunteering teams.

On World Wetlands Day, in February,  a 'Breakfast with the Birds' is held here.  After a little birding, visitors take their folding chairs and gather with breakfast around the side verandah, and lawns alongside, followed by some more wetlands birding.  February can be one of our hottest months and those verandahs can offer a welcome respite from the elements.


Originally an un-named drainage line, in 2008, the Trust applied for the name change, to Pioneer Creek.  Signage indicates that the vegetation here is classified as Estuarine Swamp Oak Forest.


uh-oh, just be 'mindful' - we better not keep looking UP for birds, all the time
 

It reads: Red-bellied Black Snake (native to eastern Australia).  Though its venom is capable of causing significant morbidity, a bite from it is not generally fatal and less venemous than other deadly Australian snakes.  It is common in woodlands, forests and swamplands of eastern Australia.

It is a relatively large species of snake reaching an average total length of 1.5 to 2 metres, although an average sized specimen would be closer to 1.4m.  Like all Elapid snakes it is front fanged.  When threatened it flattens its neck to appear more frightening. (I'm thinking that's a fair warning....)

 
 Wading through the creek, Purple Swamp Hen (do they know about the snakes?)
 

Cumbungi country!  Not a problem here according to the sign; "Crakes and Buff-banded Rails feed amongst the stalks when the water recedes.  The seeds of the Cumbungi are an important food source for Black Ducks and Grey Teal.  The corms of the roots are eaten by Dusky Moorhens, Swamphens and Brolgas.  Threatened Species like Australasian and Australian Little Bitterns live in the Cumbungi reed beds where they feed on frogs and fish, while small insectivorous birds like Reed Warblers and Little Grassbirds feed and breed among leaves.


Dusky Moorhen


 various nesting boxes can be seen


 Bunya Pines


 wonder who started this?


Chestnut Teal 

23 comments:

Margaret Adamson said...

Hi Carole. A wonderful place to explore with great wildlife. Not to keen on so many nasties around.

Bob Bushell said...

Really nice Snake, my favourite.

Joop Zand said...

It's very nice there Carole.....good photo's.

Greetings, Joop

Irma said...

Beautiful photos of a lovely area, Carole.
Seems to me beautiful to photograph there.

David Gascoigne said...

I suspect that as is the case so often where snakes are present, humans rarely encounter them.

eileeninmd said...

What a pretty place for birding..The breakfast with the birds sounds nice. Great shots of the Moorhen! Have a happy weekend! Wishing you and your family a very Happy New Year!

Seraphina´s Phantasie said...

Wonderful impressions of this park and the birds there. Amazing !

Phil Slade said...

I could just manage sitting in the shade to keep out of the midday heat - no chance! Looks a great place to explore Carole while at the same time avoiding poisonous snakes. I guess the birds wouldn't live there if the snakes became too prevalent? It looks very green at the moment with lots of places for warblers and grassbirds to hide.

Best wishes and Happy Birding for 2014.

Our photos said...

The original cottage is lovely!

Jenny Short said...

So nice to hear it is warm somewhere. Texas has been unusually cold this winter. Your your new header is pretty with the bird added. xo Jenny

Linley S said...

I wouldn't spot too many birds up in trees with that snake sign alerting me Carole. The eyes would be looking straight down.

TexWisGirl said...

you've got such great birds and trees there. :)

Brian King said...

Beautiful photos of the Swamp Hen and Moorhens! Those pines are fantastic! I typically don't think of trees like that when I think of Australia, but you do have a wide variety of landscapes.

Roy Norris said...

Looks like a really interesting place to view wildlife Carole, apart from the snakes that is.{:))
Superb new header.

John @ Sinbad and I on the Loose said...

Looks like a wonderful park and I would welcome the hot although you mentioned earlier "steamy" and that I would not.

Grandma Barb's This and That said...

Wonderful place to go birding! Love the idea of lunch on the veranda.
Happy New Year, Carole

Montanagirl said...

Thanks for the tour! It's really pretty there - not a fan of snakes though.

Wally Jones said...

I like your tour continuation! Yes, it really looks "birdy"!

I can never remember to look down while birding. That's why I always invite someone else to lead the way..... :)

Merlesworld said...

They often found red bellied blacks at the creek behind my school years ago but I haven't seen one for a long time.
This looks like a great place for bird watching, I like the little houses too.
Merle...........

EG CameraGirl said...

The chestnut teal is very handsome! Snakes are scary but I often remind myself that they are as afraid of me as I am of them. I just need to be careful. :))

Jan Castle said...

Lovely spot to explore...except for the snakes!!!
Jan

Helma said...

Chestnut Teal that I find beautiful to see. I had never met this duck.

Red Nomad OZ said...

It's a GREAT year for snakes this year!! We've even had a Red-bellied Black on our Dam - AAAAARRRRGGGGHHH!!